Alzheimer's Disease is Curable Essay Example

Alzheimer's Disease Can Be Cured

Presented by Samuel Cohen, a Research Fellow in Biophysical Chemistry at the Centre of Misfolding Diseases in the Department of Chemistry at the University of Cambridge as well as St. John's College, presents the topic of the previously believed to be incurable Alzheimer's Disease being, in all actuality, curable. In his presentation, he talks directly to the audience consistently about the disease and brings forth statistics to show the importance of the research, and or funding required to bring about a ‘block' to prevent the illness from entangling itself around the patient's brain. To support that claim, and I quote, he states, "But by 2050, it will affect 150 million people – which, by the way, will include many of you." (Timestamp 1:42, Samuel Cohen). Compared to the previous statement of "Alzheimer's now affects 40 million people worldwide" (Timestamp 1:37, Samuel Cohen), he shows that, in thirty-two years, one-hundred and ten million (110 Million) citizens of the world, thus revealing an exponential increase in a short amount of time. While the numbers may not seem huge, he included the facts that Alzheimer's Disease kills almost the same amount of cancer each year, is more expansive and yet receives less funding, therefore playing to the audience's empathy on the issue at hand. It works especially well if members of that audience have family, or friends, who have that same disease which they are trying to get the cure for. Hope isn't lost however, in this, he reveals the scientific studies made from their diverse team, proving that the illness is indeed curable as they were testing the medicine on worms with Alzheimer's. In result to the aforementioned, when presented with the medicine in early stages, the worms acted little to no different than the healthy subjects.

Using all of the evidence presented, he is able to convince the audience to advocate for the patients' who cannot speak for themselves in their times of hardship. He can convince them, with that same evidence, to help get out there to push for a cure to help them. The emotions he laced into his words, the way he spoke in general, boosted the presentation further, carrying a minor tone of desperation weaved with determination. However, the he seems stiff in his body language with the exception of moving his hands. Although, even though it isn't too deterring, he seems tense. The reason I was drawn to the subject was due to my grandmother (praise her soul) had Alzheimer's on top of Lung Cancer, and so, I generally agree with what he had to say about the ordeal. In conclusion, it was, from the opinion of a viewer, a well-thought presentation that played to the audiences' sense of empathy and providing factual examples to coax the idea that it was not a lost cause, as well as the need for improved research funding.


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